Blog Left Sidebar

How To Get More Power On Forehand

 

Learn How to Fix Your Critical Serve Mistake That No One Is Showing

Struggling to get more power on your forehand? Curious on where that power you see from everyone come from? Or do you just want to take your forehand game to the next level? If so, then this video is definitely a must-watch.

The key to fixing this power problem of the forehand is your grip and proper placement of the racket. By placing your hand around the racket and applying just enough pressure on your grip, you can maximize your swing power and acceleration. Being graceful on the court is one way to ease this fixing process. Always remember: do not be nervous; let go of that stiffness and flow freely on the court. And that’s it! Be sure to watch this video for more in-depth details on how you can add more power to your forehand swing.

Being graceful on the court is one way to ease this fixing process. Always remember: do not be nervous; let go of that stiffness and flow freely on the court. And that’s it! Be sure to watch this video for more in-depth details on how you can add more power to your forehand swing.

September 29, 2017 / by / in ,
Wilson Pro Staff 97 Racquet Review

 

Introducing the second generation of the Pro Staff 97 – the lighter, faster version of Federer’s RF 97 Autograph. With this update, Wilson gives you a more user-friendly entry point into the legendary feel and precision of the Pro Staff universe. Although the target specs remain the same, this version of the Pro Staff 97 has been meticulously reengineered with the elegant stylings and innovative paint finish that Federer chose for his RF 97. On

On court this 11.7 ounce stick not only supplies decent stability at impact, but at 7 points head light it whips through contact with surprising ease. The crisp feel is punctuated by exceptional vibration dampening and excellent ball feedback, two things made possible by some quintessential Pro Staff ingredients: a Braided Graphite layup coupled with

The crisp feel is punctuated by exceptional vibration dampening and excellent ball feedback, two things made possible by some quintessential Pro Staff ingredients: a Braided Graphite layup coupled with wonderfully thin 21.5mm beam. Factor in the open 16×19 string pattern and you have enough spin potential to paint the lines. At net the Pro Staff 97 moves into position quickly and delivers an impressive level of stability for a sub 12 ounce racquet. Touch artists will love the feel and responsiveness on droppers. With this update Wilson keeps a good thing going. Intermediate and advanced ball strikers looking for a speedy player’s racquet with controllable power and amazing feel will not be disappointed. The fact that Roger Federer helped with the design is a very nice bonus.

The fact that Roger Federer helped with the design is a very nice bonus.

September 29, 2017 / by / in
Wilson Pro Staff RF 97 Autograph (Roger Federer) Racquet Review

 

Wilson adds another chapter to the legendary Pro Staff RF 97 Autograph – a racquet specially engineered for Roger Federer, the man who helped design it. Although it has the same target specs and outstanding playability as the original RF 97, Wilson and Federer have created an update for the ages. From its sleek black matte finish to the small silhouette of Federer and laser engraved graphics, the RF 97 is Wilson’s most scrupulously detailed frame. Even the racquet’s texture has been redesigned to match Federer’s preference – a nuance that makes for easier adjustments as the racquet is spun and repositioned in response to incoming heat. Like its predecessor, this update deploys Wilson’s timeless Pro Staff formula, including a braided graphite layup, headlight balance, thin beam and Perimeter Weighting System. Toss in a thin leather grip and the result is a truly classic feel. Unlike the iconic 6.0 85, this re-engineered Pro Staff has a slightly wider, more angular beam, giving it a decidedly more powerful delivery than most traditional player’s racquets. At 12.6 ounces strung, Federer’s Pro Staff gives you massive plow-through and

From its sleek black matte finish to the small silhouette of Federer and laser engraved graphics, the RF 97 is Wilson’s most scrupulously detailed frame. Even the racquet’s texture has been redesigned to match Federer’s preference – a nuance that makes for easier adjustments as the racquet is spun and repositioned in response to incoming heat. Like its predecessor, this update deploys Wilson’s timeless Pro Staff formula, including a braided graphite layup, headlight balance, thin beam and Perimeter Weighting System. Toss in a thin leather grip and the result is a truly classic feel. Unlike the iconic 6.0 85, this re-engineered Pro Staff has a slightly wider, more angular beam, giving it a decidedly more powerful delivery than most traditional player’s racquets. At 12.6 ounces strung, Federer’s Pro Staff gives you massive plow-through and

At 12.6 ounces strung, Federer’s Pro Staff gives you massive plow-through and tour level stability, allowing you to redirect heavy pace with impressive ease. Our playtest team noted a high level of precision on full cuts, with some genuine put-away power when the mass was fully deployed. Thanks to its headlight balance (9 points!), the RF 97 feels surprisingly fast for its 12 plus ounces – a feature that will give topspin players the kind of whippy and explosive acceleration that makes for big spin. On volleys, the RF 97 is not only unfazed by heavy pace, but it possesses enough feel to drop the ball on a dime. As one of the of the most finely crafted player’s racquets Wilson has built, this heavily anticipated

On volleys, the RF 97 is not only unfazed by heavy pace, but it possesses enough feel to drop the ball on a dime. As one of the of the most finely crafted player’s racquets Wilson has built, this heavily anticipated follow- up to the original RF 97 is destined to become an instant classic.

September 28, 2017 / by / in
Tennis Drive Volley Technique | Kill High Balls

How To Kill Drive Volleys

In this video coaches Alex Slabinsky and Simon Konov break down how to kill drive volleys (swinging volleys)

There are three main stances to use and variations to each one depending on the type of ball you are dealing with.

 

 

September 27, 2017 / by / in
How to Handle High Balls – Forehand and Backhand

 

In order to handle a high ball to your backhand or forehand in tennis, you need to adjust in two ways: prepare higher and hit more across the ball. T

his video shows you Roger Federer and David Nalbandian in slow motion handling high balls on the backhand side so you can pay attention to their preparation and a different racquet path through the ball.

The usual mistakes when dealing with a high ball to the backhand or forehand are hitting it down – which brings the ball in the perfect zone for your opponent to attack, or hitting it back up which sends a passive ball over the net and allows the opponent to dictate again.

Hitting the ball horizontally enables you to hit with some pace and neutralize potential attacks.

September 23, 2017 / by / in ,
How To Hit Backhand Volley

This video is about your backhand volley, and how it serves as a vital part of your success in the tennis game, as well as the back-to-front footwork pattern to maximize the way you move around the court!

This video is also a good one for those of you who are new to tennis, as today, we will be working with someone yet unfamiliar with the correct and effective techniques; you could use this video as a guide to improving your game, simply by watching!

The title says it all All you have to do is to check out this video for a demonstration of the footwork patterns and a strategy to improve your backhand!

 

September 22, 2017 / by / in
ULTIMATE Forehand Tennis Lesson

You’re about to watch a forehand transformation. A recent student of ours came in as a strong 4.5 player, looking to reach the next level in his game.

The Problem

His forehand was already his biggest shot, but like so many tennis players it was also a liability. He’d commonly hit two or three great shots in a row but then blow it with an unforced error. To take his game to the next level he knew he needed additional offense AND higher consistency at the same time….and that’s where we came in. Progression by progression we built his awareness, understanding, and ability to execute a fundamentally different type of swing. Less linear. More circular. Up until a year and a half ago he was hitting with old, classic strokes.

Full continental forehand. He also had an old, antiquated understanding of how heavy topspin shots are actually hit. Those things changed and you’re about to see how. This video gives a direct look at our instructional process.

The Solution

Focus, awareness, purpose, and systematic progressions are all cornerstones in what we do both on the court and in our digital coaching programs. The whole Essential Tennis team was thrilled to spend two days on the court with a player who shared our passion for the improvement process and even more excited to watch him quickly progress.

 

September 21, 2017 / by / in
Tennis Volley Lesson – Touch and Transition

VIP student Corey had the same problem you probably have… the closer he got to the net, the more he amped everything up and his volley technique went out the window! In this exclusive training session we’ll show you how to develop touch and transition forward with calmness and confidence.

September 21, 2017 / by / in
How To Hit A Slice Backhand

How To Hit A Slice Backhand In Tennis – 3 Instant Tips. In this video Top Tennis Training coaches Simon Konov and Alex Slabinsky will share a few instant tennis tips with you for the tennis slice backhand.

The slice is a shot that causes many problems for a lot of tennis players around the world and in this video you will learn three tennis tips that will help you transform your backhand slice.

Common problems

1- Common problem number one is players having the racket face facing the net at contact. This would work great if you are trying to drive the backhand with topspin but doesn’t work so well when you want to cut the ball and impart slice to the shot. In order to correct this error, we need to open the strings up to the sky slightly so we can cut under the ball and add the backspin which will keep the ball low after the bounce.

2- Common problem number two is players losing control of the racket head during the contact point. Sometimes this is due to players flicking their wrist, losing control of the shot. To correct this we simply need to keep the racket and arm in and “L” shape. By maintaining this 90 degree angle we will stay solid through the contact point and this will give us extra control on the shot.

This video is brought to you by Top Tennis Training coaches Simon and Alex. Alex Slabinsky is a former ATP Pro and competed in multiple Grand Slams, was British #4 and is now an LTA Level 5 Master Performance Coach. Simon Konov is a former ITF player and has wins over ATP Pros. He has been coaching for over 10 years and has worked with players of all abilities but has a great record in producing top level junior players. He is an LTA level 4 Senior Performance coach and an RPT National Professional.

September 21, 2017 / by / in